Airboats and alligators

Our third week in Sarasota followed the same pattern as the first two.  We continued househunting, enjoyed sundowners on the beach and went to the cheap cinema again.     On Thursday we had dinner with Jane (owner of the house we were staying in) and her partner Phil, at a restaurant in St Armand’s Circle.  On Saturday afternoon we strolled along the bayfront, admiring the sculptures on display this year, and had drinks at Marina Jack’s, where we watched the sunset (not on a beach this time!).  After dinner we went to the Asolo Theatre to see an excellent production of Show Boat.

Bayfront sculptures

Bayfront sculptures

Blue bust

Blue bust

Sunset from Marina Jack's

Sunset from Marina Jack’s

After looking at many properties, we decided which was our preferred condo, but we also came to the conclusion that now was perhaps not the most sensible time to buy. We are still thinking about it, and it’s not impossible we’ll change our minds.  But having decided against immediate action, there was nothing to keep us in Sarasota, so on Monday 25th we began Phase 2 of our Florida trip.  Having spent three weeks there, Jane’s lovely house seemed like home, and it was quite sad to leave.  At the same time, it was good to be on the road again.

Sanibel Island

We had decided that, if we had enough time between home ‘exchanges’, we would take a trip to the Florida Keys.  The term ‘key’ actually means a small island, and there are literally hundreds of keys around the Florida coast.  But when people talk about the Florida Keys, or just the Keys, this means the chain of islands stretching south from the tip of mainland Florida, and linked by the US1 road.  On our way down to the Keys, we had two major stops: Sanibel Island and the Everglades.

Sanibel is a beautiful island, close to Fort Myers, which is only about 70 miles south of Sarasota. It has been a favourite place of ours since we first visited in 1982.  On this occasion we strolled along the beach at the east end of the island, where there is a lighthouse and a fishing pier, and spent some time relaxing on another beach further west. We then drove through the J N ‘Ding’ Darling nature reserve and stopped several times along the way.  We watched the fish jumping and saw lots of birds (egrets, ibis, anhingas, roseate spoonbills), but no other wildlife.

Sanibel lighthouse, in Christmas garb

Sanibel lighthouse, in Christmas garb

Fishing on the beach

Fishing on the beach

Ibis

Ibis

Waterbirds at Ding Darling nature reserve

Waterbirds at Ding Darling nature reserve

The Everglades

From Sanibel we continued our journey on the US41.  In Naples we stopped briefly at the City Pier, but decided it was too windy to spend time on the beach. After Naples the US41 turns east, and skirts the top of the Everglades National Park, passing through the Big Cypress National Preserve.  We made a number of stops along the way, and saw lots of alligators!

To travel through the reed-covered swampy land, an airboat is needed; they are not permitted in the Everglades National Park, but there are innumerable operators just outside the park boundaries, many along the US41. We did a small detour to Everglades City, the starting place for many more airboat tours.  We watched the airboats leave and return, often with pelicans perched on the front rail, or even above the engine.  But we decided this time that we would stick to the boat trips run in the National Park itself.

Airboat with pelicans

Airboat with pelicans

I'm in charge

I’m in charge

Accordingly, the next day we took a 1 hour 45 minutes boat trip from Flamingo, at the far end of the main park road.  We saw not only alligators, but crocodiles, as well as many birds and several types of mangrove trees.  On the drive back, we stopped at places where we walked short trails through hardwood ‘hammocks’, and followed boardwalks over the brackish water.  The scenery in the Everglades is not the most dramatic in the world, but it is certainly unique.

A slob-out of alligators

A slob-out of alligators

Send more tourists!

Send more tourists!

An egret leads the way for our boat

An egret leads the way for our boat

An American crocodile

An American crocodile

Stripey snail

Stripey snail

Everglades landscape

Everglades landscape

Nesting anhinga

Nesting anhinga

Along the Keys

South of Miami, the US1 road is known as the ‘Overseas Highway’.  In a stretch of more than 100 miles, it links no fewer than 31 islands by a series of bridges and causeways, including the famous Seven-Mile Bridge.  The islands vary in size; some are tiny (blink, and you’ll miss them) while others like Key Largo and Marathon have towns with lots of shops and motels.  But with the Atlantic on one side, and the Gulf of Mexico on the other, it is a unique and unforgettable drive.

This was our third visit to the Keys, the first being at Christmas 1982 and the second during the summer of 1989. On the first day the weather – although warm – was grey and cloudy, so we were not tempted to head for a beach.  We stopped to look at some tacky souvenir shops, as well as some more upmarket arts and crafts exhibitions. We saw the African Queen – not a replica, but the actual boat used in the film of the same name.  We stopped for a picnic lunch and a nature trail at Long Key. This reminded us of 1989, when we landed in Miami, bought camping gear from a shop there and then headed for the Keys.  Long Key was our first stop, and the first time we erected out own tent.  We struggled on that occasion to follow the instructions, although once we got the idea, it became very easy.

African Queen

African Queen

Santa sells lurid t-shirts on the Keys

Santa sells lurid t-shirts on the Keys

The next day there was a dramatic change in the weather, from clouds to a perfect blue sky and bright sun. We stopped at Bahia Honda, the most beautiful of all the Keys.  Wearing t-shirts and shorts as usual, we strolled along the narrow white sand beach between the sea and the palm trees.  We watched the pelicans diving, and tried to believe that this was really November.

View from Bahia Honda beach

View from Bahia Honda beach

Diving pelicans

Diving pelicans

Posing on the beach

Posing on the beach

The old road bridge - mind the gap

The old road bridge – mind the gap

Finally we reached the end of the road – Key West.  But that’s another story…..

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